(Source: holdmygold, via tolovemykinks)

(Source: 3rdeyebella, via tolovemykinks)

Someone calling a white person ‘wonder bread’ isn’t racist. It’s rude, but it’s not racist. Wonder bread as an offensive term has no weight, no meaning. It’s just something to push your buttons. Using the N-word is racist - it has meaning and weight and brings up a past that should’ve never happened. The comparison between rude and racist is like squares and rectangles - every square is a rectangle, but not every rectangle is a square. Every racist comment you hear is rude, but not every rude comment you hear is racist.

from an in-class debate about white supremacy  (via berriesandjuices)

❗️❕❗️‼️

(via whitepeoplesaidwhat)

(Source: seehowtame, via whitepeoplesaidwhat)

loclivin:

Lauryn Hill

loclivin:

Lauryn Hill

lauriettebe:

cecileemeke:

Johny Pitts on Strolling by Cecile Emeke: Whiteness, Malsculinity, Colourism & More (Full discourse HERE)

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"the blacker the woman the less feminine she is"  

(via jervae)

Reblog if people say you don’t look your age.

yokhakidfiasco:

trebled-negrita-princess:

lvrslaflame:

nomorewaterthefirenexttime:

221,863 black people reblogged this

lmfaoooo 

image

Lol

(Source: kooley-high, via beautiesofafrique)

postracialcomments:

My sister speaking about my niece (on the right)

We’ve made sure to instill pride in all of our nieces and nephews. It’s hard however when you have other Black kids who feel otherwise. 

Make sure you tell a Black girl and/or boy that they are beautiful today. Tell them their hair is beautiful and their skin is gorgeous. We have to rebuild the esteems of the kids in our community.

(via beautiesofafrique)

peaksa:

~shoves my ass into a mirror~

peaksa:

~shoves my ass into a mirror~

(Source: moosekleenex, via arealgirlsblog)